Saturday, 19 August 2017

REVIEW; Fair Game, by Monica Murphy

Rating: 

Genre: New-Adult, Contemporary 

Recommend: Yes

Book 1

NO SPOILERS!!! 

Summary:

Jade's boyfriend bets her at a poker game, in the hopes he can win $50,000. He loses. Jade now owes the arrogant infamous Shepard Prescott. 
He loves watching her squirm and chasing after the one girl who keeps saying 'No'. But as Shep starts to fall for the feisty girl, he has to convince Jade he is no longer playing games and may actually be falling in love with her. 

My Thoughts:

I don't know if I am in a lull in regards to NA Romance novels, as a lot I've read lately I've just been skipping paragraphs and eye-rolling. But then Tijan, Colleen Hoover & Tarryn Fisher can still write words that get inside my heart and my head and keep me awake at night and think

First 50% of this book: It was really good and I actually read it in one sitting as I was so hooked. I feel the start was extremely strong; it begins with the poker game and Jade being part of the bet. The chemistry between Jade and Shep is amazing, their banter hilarious. But honestly, the book fell from there. 

Second 50%: Predictable, boring. Ok, it wasn't bad. But as soon as everything starts up with the two, it just follows the same pattern in 95% of other YA/NA books. There were no twists or aspects that make the book stand out. Once they got together, everything was hunky dory and wonderful together - which, yes, can happen in real life obviously. But it was just boring :( sorry!

All the intimate scenes just felt like repeats, and I ended up skipping a lot of the last few as they added nothing to the overall story and the whole plot of the book felt like a massive shift. Meanwhile, slut shaming galore! So, Jade talks about how her roommate just goes from guy to guy but isn't 'a slut or anything'. Why does that statement have to be added? Just state how Jade and Kelli treat guys differently but stop with the slut shaming in every goddamn NA book! 

Shep: I didn't like him. I liked him for the first chapter, but for the intimate scenes, or when he was trying to charm Jade early on, I just cringed so much at his lines and arrogance. As he fell for Jade, granted, he did improve in respecting her and behaviour and there was a struggle between his old "player" self and trying to be a good boyfriend to Jade. I didn't find his arrogant nature swoon-worthy in the slightest anyway. 

Both main characters, of course, had parental issues!! What NA book would have a main character with a nice family?! But anyway, neither actually acknowledged the issues they had with their parents until it was imperative for the story and keep the plot turning. 

Overall:

I nearly DNF'd, but persevered. Not the best book I've read and a very flat and predictable story line. 

Saturday, 12 August 2017

REVIEW; Luckiest Girl Alive, by Jessica Knoll

Rating: 

Genre: Thriller

Recommend: No

Standalone

SPOILERS!!! 

Summary:

Ani FaNelli is engaged to a notable figure, she has a promising glamorous career, and is moving up the ranks in city's social scene. Ani is determined to keep her image prestigious and proud. She now has landed an interview/documentary series about her life. But when she was a teenager and attended Bradley School, there were some drunken nights and painful events that Ani has worked hard to bury. With the documentary looming, Ani's past threatens to come to life. 

My Thoughts:

DNF at about 60%. Up to this point there was no aspect that constitutes as psychological thriller in the slightest. In the 60% I read, all that had been covered was Ani attempting to keep her facade up in front of her fiance, and then the ordeals she endured as a teenager at school... She judged other women based on how they looked and what they wore and apparently depending how you place a clam shell down on your plate is a giveaway on how posh you are... wonderful - but still no thriller... 

Ani is reunited with her teacher, who cared for Ani when he heard she had been attacked by a student. Now older, he is taking part in the documentary about Ani's life and she is concerned about what he will disclose, whilst also fancy-ing him and being jealous of his partner, despite Ani supposedly being happily engaged. I somewhat enjoyed her vindictive side and attempts to be a socialite... but nothing happened! 

Overall:

I can't recommend this due to not being able to complete it. By 60% nothing had occurred to warrant it being a thriller, never mind a psychological one. I really don't see what has won so many high ratings and a movie deal. 

Saturday, 5 August 2017

REVIEW; Unseen Messages, by Pepper Winters

Rating: 

Genre: New-Adult, Contemporary 

Recommend: Yes

Standalone

SPOILERS!!! 

Summary:

Estelle ignores all the signs before getting on her flight. She knows the universe is trying to tell her something. After crash-landing on a secluded island in Fiji, she has to step up. Along with Galloway, the pair find themselves taking care of two orphaned children, and learning to survive in the wilderness along with their injuries. As hope turns to acceptance, the new family unit have to fight to survive and live alongside each other, adapting to island living. 

My Thoughts:

With 591 pages, I was so excited to get lost in this book and escape. Although not as lost as they get in the book! 

I feel like this is a total different genre of book compared to what Pepper Winters has written before. There was no taboo or dark themes in this. 

Estelle: Poor woman! She has been flung into stardom and following her music tour all she wants to do is go home. Despite all the warning signs to not get on the plane - she ignores them so she can get home quickly. I don't quite understand her reasoning to get on a dodgy helicopter after her haste to return home, but hey ho. 

Galloway: I didn't really like him for the majority of the book. He only saw Estelle as a sex object for the initial time when stranded. He had a broken leg and couldn't walk, but was angry with Estelle for taking care of them. How archaic! While the survival instinct flared up in Estelle, I never felt it did with Galloway. However, with the dual POV, we do get an insight into his past and thought process and I think this really saved him as a character as viewing him from Estelle's POV would not have sufficed. 

Pacing: The book spans about 7 or 8 years (I think). For the majority of the time on the island, the pacing was brilliantly done - with time skipped when necessary but notable moments developed, so it never really felt like it dragged. 

Plot: I enjoyed (more than I expected) the story of survival and the information of how they learned to cope and survive e.g. Estelle testing the plants for any allergic reactions to try and discover more food. There was one death I really didn't enjoy (but sort of understand why it was required) and it tore me up! There was a lot regarding the blossoming romance that frustrated me. If there had just been some better communication there would have been a lot less drama and hassle, although that would've defeated the a lot of the sub-plots then... 

Ending: I loved that the story continues beyond being rescued and the twists still occur once they get to Australia. There wasn't that immediate happy ending at being rescued and returning to civilisation. I actually think this was one of the best endings to such a great long story. 

Overall:

I think this would be a wonderful holiday read to get totally lost in. It's quite dangerous and graphic, with some truly heart-wrenching scenes.